Welcoming Hope: Poems for those in need

Poems From Oostburg, Wisconsin

One more book note in the spirit of National Poetry Month:

Welcoming Hope: Poems for those in need (2007, Elin Grace Publishing) is a poetry anthology we published with Time Of Singing: A Journal Of Christian Poetry.  There are poems by many poets.  Lora Homan Zill and I co-edited the book, and Charles A. Waugaman was the Art Editor and Illustrator.

This book is still in print and blessing other people.  It is the first book listed on the Time Of Singingbooks page, followed by the Christmas chapbook.  There is a picture of the cover of the hope book, with a list of the poets.  Lora is handling the sales of the books.  All proceeds benefit Time Of Singing.  I love the way blogs and print journals can support one another.

Over the years, I’ve been told that I have “the gift of encouragement.” …

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The Migration of Melt

leaf and twig

DSC02986
the brook breaks free
and runs for the river
longing to unite with the sea

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Make Space, Not Time

Liquid Mercury

“In my dream the angel smiled and said, if we fail this time it will be a failure of imagination and then she gently placed the world in the palm of my hand.” – Brian Andreas, Imaginary World

Out of Time

Almost a year ago I wrote a post called Everything is Now which has been, by far, my most popular piece to date.  In one of those examples of why the blogosphere can be such a great forum for idea exchange, a comment made by T.K. from Breakfast with Words made me revisit the ideas of that post in a deep new way;

“Suddenly having the entire day disappear in front of me is scary.  But what if time is only a matter of perspective… of relativity”

On the one hand, I had argued in “Everything is Now” (based on genuine belief) against the existence of time as separate…

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Weekend Edition – Imagine A World of Writers Plus Good Reads and Writing Tips

Live to Write - Write to Live

Imagine a World of Writers

"Dear Earth" by Katie Daisy via etsy “Dear, Earth” by Katie Daisy via etsy

More people should write. They should write about their days and their dreams, about their hopes and their fears, about their families and their histories and their possible futures. They should write lists and poems and wild ramblings that sound like the intoxicated rantings of a idiot savant. They should tell stories, wonderful, improbable, made-up stories. They should sink or dig or dive or fall or claw their way into that place inside where the stories live, and pull them out like blunt-edged gems from deep within the living, breathing earth. They should write lies that are true and truths that uncover lies. They should weave secrets into the spaces between the words, and then give those secrets gladly to the world. For those of us bitten by the writing bug, it is near impossible (and quite terrifying)…

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Five Often Overlooked Steps to Getting Started as a Freelance Content Marketer

Live to Write - Write to Live

journey one stepSeven years ago this spring, I was a freshly minted single mom building a new life for myself and my daughter amidst the wreckage of a less-than-amicable divorce. I wasn’t sure how I was going to keep things afloat financially, but I knew I didn’t want to return to my old agency life of sixty-hour weeks and around-the-clock meetings. Having spent the first three years of her life at home with my little girl, I was determined to find a way to work as an independent freelancer.

Through the serendipitous inquiries of several acquaintances, I managed to land a couple of long-term, freelance project management gigs. I snapped up the chance to generate some semi-regular income working remotely; but – although I was (very) grateful for the opportunities – I knew that, ultimately, I didn’t want to build my business around project management. I wanted to write.

This is the…

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Printers Row presents Kate Mulgrew in conversation with Heidi Stevens this Thursday at Venue SIX10

Chicago Literati

Actress Kate Mulgrew, who rose to fame on Star Trek: Voyager for her portrayal of Admiral Kathryn Janeway and is now a series regular on the popular Netflix series, Orange is the New Black, will join Chicago Tribune columnist, Heidi Stevens in conversation this Thursday at Venue SIX10 (610 S Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60605) at 7pm.

This special event is sponsored by Printers Rowand Trib Nation. Mulgrew will read from her new memoir, Born With Teeth, which addresses her history of playing strong women on television as well as her personal triumphs and tribulations.

Tickets for this event are $20 and can be purchased here.

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Not Good Enough: Confronting Gendered Self-Doubt by Stephanie Sylverne

Chicago Literati

Two years ago, while my grandmother was dying of cancer, I discovered she’d once had a calligraphy piece in an exhibition at the Newberry Library, an independent research institution in Chicago. She didn’t tell me this herself; I happened to find an old brochure from the event with her name listed as an exhibitor.

How could she neglect to mention this? Being part of a Newberry exhibition is definitely a brag-worthy accomplishment. Plus I’d started working on an historical novel that featured the library rather prominently, and was also based quite a bit on her family’s past, so the connection was sort of serendipitous.

I asked her where the piece was. I wanted to take it home and add it to the shrine of her artwork that was steadily collecting in my house. “Oh, that. I gave that away a long time ago,” she told me.

“You gave it away?…

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